I have a Ph.D in Ethnomusicology from SOAS, University of London (2017), an M.A. in Ethnomusicology (UBC 2008), and a B.A. in Interdisciplinary Studies (UBC 2006). I am currently a sessional lecturer in music at Simon Fraser University and Vancouver Community College. My research focusses on music, identity, and representation in transnational music revivals. 

My primary research project is an ethnographic study of jew’s harp revival communities based on multi-sited fieldwork in Norway, Austria, Sicily, and online. My work uses the jew’s harp to examine how musical instruments reflect changing tastes, technologies, and social identities, and how transnational music communities are changing radically in the digital age. This research was supported by a Doctoral Fellowship from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC), and a Research Scholarship from SOAS, University of London.

My work engages with the musical ethnography of Europe, and aligns with the growing area of historical ethnomusicology. While the jew’s harp has been one of the most popular musical instruments in Europe since the Middle Ages, it has long been seen as an object of little value, sitting at the junctions between classical and folk, public art and private enjoyment, and urban and rural. My research demonstrates how the jew’s harp and the study of “unpopular” music can be used to critically engage with the core concepts of value, virtuosity, and productivity at the centre of European musical discourse.

My full academic profile is available on:

MA Thesis
Morgan, Deirdre. 2008. "Organs and bodies: The Jew’s harp and the anthropology of musical instruments". MA thesis, University of British Columbia.